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Georgia PIRG: Tax offshoring costs Georgia $569 million

A Georgia consumer group claims the state lost $569 million in corporate income taxes in 2011 from companies using offshore tax havens.

In a study released Tuesday, Georgia Public Interest Research Group Education Fund said “states automatically lose billions of dollars in revenue each year simply because their tax codes are closely linked to federal tax codes. When multinational firms shift the reporting of profits offshore on their federal taxes, those profits go un- reported for state tax purposes too.”

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News Release | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Tax

Offshore Tax Dodging Blows a $918 Million Hole in Georgia Budget

ATLANTA, February 5th – With Georgia in the midst of a continued budget crunch, the Georgia PIRG Education Fund, joined by Alan Essig of the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, released a new study revealing that Georgia lost $918 million due to offshore tax dodging last year. Many of America’s wealthiest individuals and largest corporations, use tax loopholes to shift profits made in America to offshore tax havens, where they pay little to no taxes.

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Report | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Tax

The Hidden Cost of Offshore Tax Havens

When U.S. corporations and wealthy individuals use offshore tax havens to avoid paying taxes to the federal government, it is an abuse of our tax system. Tax haven abusers benefit from our markets, infrastructure, educated workforce, and security, but they pay next to nothing for these benefits. Ultimately, taxpayers must pick up the tab, either in the form of higher taxes, cuts to public spending priorities, or increased national debt.

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Atlanta Gets "F" for Spending Transparency

How transparent is Atlanta’s city government when it comes to spending? Not very, according to a report released by a consumer advocacy group today.

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Watchdog group: Atlanta flunks transparency test

The city of Atlanta got an “F” for spending transparency in a study of the 30 largest American cities by a Georgia watchdog group.

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Report | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Deflate Your Rate

At the end of the year 2000, U.S. households were accruing interest on $574 billion of revolving credit card debt, or debt carried over to the next month rather than paid off entirely. The average household with a credit card balance carried revolving debt of nearly $10,000. A household making the minimum payments—commonly only two percent of the unpaid balance or $20, whichever is greater—on this debt would pay nearly $1,500 in interest just in the first year. Nationally, consumers pay interest of more than $87 billion annually on this revolving debt.

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